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February 2019

February 16, 2019 Lecture by Bruce Hindmarsh

February 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Registration is now open!  Click HERE to register for this event. "Look Upon Nothing as Separate from God”: Evangelicals and the Rise of Science The significant spiritual awakening in the North Atlantic that appeared in the eighteenth century took place among those who were the first generation to accept the basic postulates of Isaac Newton and to embrace the new science. The world of nature was now neither possessed of a transcendent spiritual form (Plato) nor an immanent spiritual form (Aristotle), so how was one to understand the relation of things spiritual and things material?  A number of the early evangelicals engaged with this question in a sophisticated way and this lecture will explore their answers. Jonathan Edwards was a young undergraduate at Yale when Newton’s Principia and Opticks were first taken out of their wooden crates and added to the college library collection, and he studied these works exhaustively.  John Wesley also produced one of the most comprehensive compendia of the period of the latest findings of science.  To these can be added a number of additional figures over the course of the century, including poets, amateur astronomers, mathematicians, and others--thoughtful and religiously minded people who responded to the world revealed by science with “wonder, love, and praise." Bruce Hindmarsh is Professor of Spiritual Theology at Regent College in Vancouver, BC, Canada. To learn more about Bruce Hindmarsh, click HERE.  

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April 2019

April 13, 2019 Lecture by Steven Notley

April 13, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Lanier Theological Library, 14130 Hargrave Rd.
Houston, 77070 United States

Registration is open! Click HERE to register for this event. Has Bethsaida-Julias Finally Been Found? Modern-day pilgrims to the Holy Land are often unaware that until recently almost every site they visit had been lost for centuries - destroyed, abandoned and forgotten.  Only in the middle nineteenth-century did explorers from abroad begin the process of relocating places mentioned in the Bible and other ancient writings (e.g., Megiddo, Capernaum, Masada). One such location has drawn recent attention and debate.  For the last 30 years, archaeologists working on the site of et-Tell, north of the Sea of Galilee, have identified it with New Testament Bethsaida. However, nagging questions about their claim have persisted.  Its remote distance (1 ½ miles) from the lakeshore makes it an odd location for a fishing village described in both Jewish and Christian sources.  In addition, the minimal Roman period remains found there do not fit the description by those who walked its streets. For the last three seasons (2016-2018) archaeologists and volunteers from Kinneret College (Israel) and Nyack College (New York) have excavated el-Araj, another suggested location for Bethsaida. In August 2017, headlines around the world announced that Bethsaida, the home of Peter, Andrew and Philip (John 1:44), had finally been found. In this presentation, we will consider the method by which archaeologists and historians identify ancient sites. Using the case of el-Araj, we will ask what was unearthed and why it is significant. How do the excavations at el-Araj compare with the historical picture of Bethsaida-Julias from the ancient sources?  Steve Notley will present the findings from the first three seasons of the El-Araj Excavation Project, which may have finally found evidence for Herod Philip’s urbanization of this New Testament era fishing village on the Sea of Galilee, transforming it into a Jewish polis. Steven Notley is Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at Nyack College in New York City. To learn more about Steven Notley, click HERE.  

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May 2019

May 18, 2019 Lecture by Andrew Macintosh

May 18, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Lanier Theological Library, 14130 Hargrave Rd.
Houston, 77070 United States

Registration is now open for this event!  Click HERE to register!   Shock and Awe: The Old Testament Prophet Hosea in Recent Research Andrew Macintosh was commissioned to write a commentary on Hosea by the prestigious International Critical Commentary series, and his work was published in 1997. Hosea-through-Malachi counts as one book in the Hebrew Bible, called “the 12.” Hosea is a Northerner and his language is dialectal (e.g., “all y’all” in Texas, and “yous guys” in New Jersey). Hosea 1-3 constitutes a preface which sets the scene for the whole book.     Some of the topics which this lecture will address include these: From sympathetic magic to history, the function of prophets and prophecy The prophet and his God; the prophet and the Canaanite god of fertility, Baal Good and bad syncretism Hosea’s wife and three children Archaeological evidence from the Sinai desert for Hosea’s time “Sowing the wind and reaping the whirlwind” Painful forgiveness The savage and complete end of Hosea’s Israel The Song of Songs, human love and divine love; the (Christian) sacrament of marriage Wisdom as a female companion of God; Wisdom opposed to promiscuity Andrew Macintosh is Professor of Hebrew and Emeritus Dean at St. John's College, Cambridge University in England. To learn more about Andrew Macintosh, click HERE.    

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September 2019

September 28, 2019 Lecture by Katharine Hayhoe

September 28, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Lanier Theological Library, 14130 Hargrave Rd.
Houston, 77070 United States

Registration is now open for this event!  Click HERE to register! Christians, Climate, and our Culture in the U.S. Mounting scientific evidence clearly documents the risks posed by climate change to the poor, the needy, and other vulnerable populations, the very people Christians are called to love. As the scientific evidence builds, however, so does the vocal opposition to this evidence. In the U.S., much of the disagreement comes from political and religious conservatives. Why is climate change so polarizing to these communities? What makes it so hard to comprehend and accept? Combining basic tenets of the Christian faith with recent findings from the areas of psychology, sociology, and climate science, this lecture will present potential reasons for these disagreements and the role that shared values may play in moving us forward past these barriers. Katharine Hayhoe is an Atmospheric Scientist and Professor of Political Science at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. To learn more about Katharine Hayhoe, click HERE.

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